The effects of bundled interventions on clinical practice for fertility preservation amongst young cancer patients

The consequences of cancer and treatment on fertility can be a continuing source of distress for adolescent and young adults. Oncofertility is a developing specialty that focuses on  the reproductive future for cancer survivors as well as interventions to manage the psychosocial aspects of loss of reproductive function. This project aimed to identify the clinical practice of fertility preservation for young people aged 15-24 years across five tertiary cancer centres in Queensland. Data were examined over a five year period (2012-2016) regarding documented risk of infertility discussions, referral to fertility specialists and fertility preservation. Analysis identify variation in clinical practice associated with age, gender and disease type. While targeted interventions in 2015 were effective in reducing variations across some domains, the lack of uniform guidelines, clear referral pathways and limited consensus on the best way to deliver and provide services continue as barriers to equitable fertility preservation. We aim to develop further interventions to address these issues. For more information, please contact the lead PI – Dr Natalie Bradford. Click here to access to report published in the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology. 

QCCS Team Members

Prof Ray Chan

Prof Ray Chan

Nurse (QCCS Co-Chair)
QCCS Co-Chair and Professor of Nursing

Doctor of Philosophy (Queensland University of Technology), Master of Applied Science (Research) (Queensland University of Technology), Bachelor of Nursing (Queensland University of Technology)

Dr Raymond Chan is Professor of Cancer Nursing, Princess Alexandra Hospital and Queensland University of Technology. He currently holds a NHMRC Health Professional Research Fellowship. He is currently the President for the Cancer Nurses Society of Australia (CNSA), the peak professional body representing over 1,200 cancer nurses across Australia. To date, he has attracted over 6 million (AUD) of research project grants as a chief investigator (> $1 Million as CIA) to undertake research in supportive cancer care. Dr Chan is a chief investigator for 4 current NHMRC project grants and has published over 80 peer-reviewed articles. He is also the Associate Editor for Cancer Nursing: An International for Cancer Care (Ranking 8/108 in Nursing).

Recent funded project highlights include:

  • (2017-2020): A sequential multiple assignment randomised trial (SMART) of nursing interventions to reduce pain associated with chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy. NHMRC (CID)
  • (2016-2019): Peripherally InSerted Central catheter Securement: the PISCES Trial. NHMRC (CIC)
  • (2014-2017): Development and evaluation of a nurse-led, tailored self-management behavioural intervention for managing distressing symptoms in patients with advanced cancer (The SM2 Study). RBWH Foundation and NHMRC (CIA)
  • (2014-2015): Younger women’s wellness after cancer program.  RBWH Foundation (CID)
  • (2014): Central venous Access device SeCurement And Dressing Effectiveness in Cancer Care: The CASCADE Trial.  RBWH Foundation (CIA)
  • (2013-2016): Improving quality of life in high-risk cancer populations: a randomised trial of a structured intervention for head and neck cancer survivors. NHMRC (CIJ)
  • (2012-2013): A double-blind randomised controlled trial of Moogoo Udder Cream® versus aqueous cream for managing radiation-induced skin reactions in patients with cancer.  RBWH Foundation; Office of Health and Medical Research; Cancer Nurses Society of Australia; Moogoo Skincare
  • (2011-2014): The RSVP Trial:  Replacement of Intravascular device administration sets after Standard Versus Prolonged use. NHMRC and RBWH Foundation (CIG)
  • (2010): Self-management associated with fatigue in patients with advanced cancer. RBWH Foundation, Queensland Nursing Council, Royal College of Nursing Australia (CIA)

Recent QCCS Project

 

Research Keywords 

Cancer Care, Supportive Care, Cancer Nursing, Survivorship Care
40%

 

Symptom Management, Quality of Life, Palliative Care, End-of-life Care
40%

 

Evidence-based Practice, Cochrane Systematic Reviews
20%

 

  

 

 

 

Dr Natalie Bradford

Dr Natalie Bradford

Nurse

Senior Research Fellow, Queensland University of Technology

The consequences of cancer and treatment on fertility can be a continuing source of distress for adolescent and young adults. Oncofertility is a developing specialty that focuses on  the reproductive future for cancer survivors as well as interventions to manage the psychosocial aspects of loss of reproductive function. This project aimed to identify the clinical practice of fertility preservation for young people aged 15-24 years across five tertiary cancer centres in Queensland. Data were examined over a five year period (2012-2016) regarding documented risk of infertility discussions, referral to fertility specialists and fertility preservation. Analysis identify variation in clinical practice associated with age, gender and disease type. While targeted interventions in 2015 were effective in reducing variations across some domains, the lack of uniform guidelines, clear referral pathways and limited consensus on the best way to deliver and provide services continue as barriers to equitable  fertility preservation. We aim to develop further interventions to address these issues.

Projects

  • The effects of bundled interventions on clinical practice for fertility preservation amongst young cancer patients

Roslyn Henney

Nurse & Hospital Executive

Service Director, Youth Cancer Services

Roslyn is the Service Manager of the Queensland Youth Cancer Service. As a registered nurse she has significant leadership experience at both a service and executive level in health management. Roslyn holds a Master of Health Administration, UNSW; and a GradDip in Early Childhood Studies, Melbourne.

Projects

  • The effects of bundled interventions on clinical practice for fertility preservation amongst young cancer patients